Let’s give moms a break when it comes to breastfeeding

It’s World BreastFeeding Week and UNICEF and WHO are running full-steam ahead with their campaigns. Yet, while breastfeeding is an ideal, this kind of campaign is adding extra pressure on new parents, particularly moms, if they can’t or decide not to breastfeed based on their needs and situations.

Breastfeeding is an ideal – and this campaign clearly wants people to support it – yet for most moms and dads who’ve gone through the realities of ‘natural’ feeding, it’s not such a rosy picture. There’s the difficulties of latching, the pumping, the sleepless nights, the constant social pressures of equating breastfeeding to being a good parent.

While there’s been some alternative perspective on the week-long campaign, this recent study published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal highlights that women with unmet expectations about breastfeeding may be at higher risk for postpartum depression (PPD).

According to Maria Iacovou, PhD, a sociologist at the University of Cambridge in England and an author of the study, the benefits of breastfeeding is not new information. “But what is new – and urgent from a public health perspective – is that there is increased PPD risk among women who plan to breastfeed and then are not able to.”

The study suggests that women who wanted to breastfeed and did not may be in the most vulnerable position, possibly because they feel disappointment and guilt in addition to not getting the physiological benefits of breastfeeding.

If moms who are depressed fail at breastfeeding, that is another strike against their perceptions of being a good mom.

The study ultimately underlines the importance of providing expert breastfeeding support to women who want to breastfeed, but also to provide compassionate support for women who had intended to breastfeed, but who find themselves unable to.

I’ve been told that World Breastfeeding Week is trying to target developing countries because breastfeeding is the best way to provide infants with the nutrients they need. If this is the case, the message could be more specific, otherwise it might inadvertently be perpetuating social pressures leading to unnecessary stress and anxiety for parents who have the choice to decide how they want to feed their child.