Suicide does not discriminate.

Today is World Suicide Prevention Day… and by the time I finish writing this post, more people will have died by suicide. According to the World Health Organization, suicide kills one person every 40 seconds. That’s on average about 800,000 people a year – and for every person who dies by suicide, many more people attempt suicide every year.

Source: http://www.who.int/mental_health/suicide-prevention/world_report_2014/en/
Source: http://www.who.int/mental_health/suicide-prevention/world_report_2014/en/

It’s a staggering figure and a significant one that demands more attention. It happens to the rich and poor… young and old… the mentally stable and ill. Suicide does not discriminate. While we typically think suicide is linked to mental health issues (i.e. depression and alcohol use), many suicides also happen impulsively in moments of crisis and life stresses such as financial problems, relationship break-up or chronic pain and illness. Suicide rates are also high amongst people who experience discrimination, such as refugees, migrants, indigenous peoples, LGBTI persons, and prisoners.

Talking about suicide is no joke. There’s a fine line between joking about it and to actually thinking about self-harm and suicide. And if this leads to an attempt, then it’s definitely time to pay attention before it’s too late. The Canadian Mental Health Association has an easy way to remember the warning signs:

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There are plenty of resources about suicide prevention and education. Ones that I’ve found useful in Canada include:

I found these resources useful because they focus on providing information about preventing and understanding suicide, as well as helping me process my experience with a suicide death. One of the best things when I moved back to Vancouver was to find that there’s a specific suicide support service called SAFER (Suicide Attempt Follow-up, Education and Research). Not only is SAFER a community-based outpatient service that provides counseling for people who are feeling suicidal, it provides free counseling for people bereaved by a suicide death.

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From a public health policy perspective, suicide is a complex issue and so prevention requires coordination and collaboration between various health and non-health sectors – WHO’s recommendations for prevention and control includes:

  • Reducing access to the means of suicide (e.g. pesticides, firearms, certain medications)
  • Reporting by media in a responsible way
  • Introducing alcohol policies to reduce the harmful use of alcohol
  • Early identification, treatment and care of people with mental and substance use disorders, chronic pain and acute emotional distress
  • Training of non-specialized health workers in the assessment and management of suicidal behaviour
  • Follow-up care for people who attempted suicide and provision of community support

Suicide prevention is a good goal… in the meantime many people have to deal with the aftermath. I found the below video really helpful to connect with what I am going through, and also to share with people who want an insight into the grief from suicide.

Ride Don’t Hide

Living with grief definitely affects my mental health and it’s made me realize that despite the “norm”, everyone at some point suffers from a mental health issue. It’s pretty easy to think about our physical health and take steps to keep in shape – like exercising, watching what we eat, or even wearing sunscreen to protect our skin. According to the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), safeguarding our mental health is just as important.

Many of us don’t consciously make an effort to stay mentally healthy. Mental health isn’t just about mental illness, its about feeling good about who you are, having balance in your life and in your thinking, and responding constructively to life’s highs and lows. Everyone should practice good mental health.

Because my grief is linked to mental health, I jumped at the chance to volunteer for the Ride Don’t Hide movement to support and raise awareness about why mental health is so important.

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My family and I teamed up to be route marshals for an important segment of the 60km route of the event. This “hair-pin” turn off the No. 2 Road Bridge in Richmond was a tricky one because the cyclists needed to come off the bridge and immediately turn onto a small bike path that led them to a residential area just across from the Vancouver International Airport. Of the 1200 cyclists that registered for the event, half of them (around 600) passed our post.

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As the crew for the No. 2 Road Bridge and Dover Park, we cheered riders on and directed riders to keep to the route… I even had to help someone fix their bike chain! All in all, waking up early to volunteer for a couple hours on a Sunday morning was really rewarding – the sunny weather definitely made the day much more enjoyable!

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The Ride Don’t Hide movement began on 1 August 2010, as Vancouver teacher and newspaper columnist Michael Schratter cycled 40,000 km, crossing six continents and 33 countries. In addition to raising funds for CMHA, Michael’s mission was to circumnavigate the world, sharing stories with people in different countries, to bring awareness to the stigma surrounding mental illness.

Here are some interesting stats about mental health in Canada:

  • 1 in 10 Canadians will suffer from a mental illness in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 7 Canadian women experience depression in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 8 Canadians experience a mood disorder like depression in their lifetime.
  • About 1.2 million Canadian children and youth experience a mental illness, but less than 20% receive help.